Occupy Central, and the Myth and Misunderstanding of Reform

hazlittmag:

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Technically speaking, Xi Jinping has been President of the People’s Republic of China since nearly the Ides of March, 2013. Because of the somewhat arcane way the Communist Party of China operates, however, he has effectively been in command since November 2012, when he ascended to the role of General Secretary of the party’s Central Committee, and (more importantly) Chairman of the Central Military Commission, the party’s top military decision-making body.

That five-month interregnum gave western reporters more than enough time to ask the question we ask every time there’s a new ruler in Beijing: is he a reformer? Might this signal a lessening of press and political restrictions? Can we imagine a day when mainlanders might actually get to enjoy the rights the Taiwanese have enjoyed for nearly 20 years—namely, a vote?

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Masters in the Sheets, Metaphors in the Streets

hazlittmag:

image

Sex as character study has had a necessarily short history on television screens, maybe 20 years on the outside edge. Even now, anything on the non-cable airwaves is still pretty much just a proxy, at best only alluded to, although the relative graphicness of the sex is about the only thing that really separates the approach. Sex is always pretty much just an adjunct to what we already know about a character, their personality writ on the walls of their bedroom: Elaine’s blasé attitude about others is summed up in her yada yada yadas about sex, Don Draper is as boozily dominant with his weekday trysts as he is in the office, and, hell, the Sex in the City women’s sexual appetites ran precisely parallel to their lifestyle choices. Occasionally, the kind of sex someone has will be a sort of ironic counterpoint to their actual persona—say, that time Draper wanted to get smacked around a little—but it’s rare that we get deeper than the binary: it’s either perfect analogue or negative image, sexual personality inescapable from actual.

Continue

Occupy Central, and the Myth and Misunderstanding of Reform

Technically speaking, Xi Jinping has been President of the People’s Republic of China since nearly the Ides of March, 2013. Because of the somewhat arcane way the Communist Party of China operates, however, he has effectively been in command since November 2012, when he ascended to the role of General Secretary of the party’s Central Committee, and (more importantly) Chairman of the Central Military Commission, the party’s top military decision-making body.

That five-month interregnum gave western reporters more than enough time to ask the question we ask every time there’s a new ruler in Beijing: is he a reformer? Might this signal a lessening of press and political restrictions? Can we imagine a day when mainlanders might actually get to enjoy the rights the Taiwanese have enjoyed for nearly 20 years—namely, a vote?

Continue

Image via

beatonna:

Drama died at the bus stop 

Masters in the Sheets, Metaphors in the Streets

Sex as character study has had a necessarily short history on television screens, maybe 20 years on the outside edge. Even now, anything on the non-cable airwaves is still pretty much just a proxy, at best only alluded to, although the relative graphicness of the sex is about the only thing that really separates the approach. Sex is always pretty much just an adjunct to what we already know about a character, their personality writ on the walls of their bedroom: Elaine’s blasé attitude about others is summed up in her yada yada yadas about sex, Don Draper is as boozily dominant with his weekday trysts as he is in the office, and, hell, the Sex in the City women’s sexual appetites ran precisely parallel to their lifestyle choices. Occasionally, the kind of sex someone has will be a sort of ironic counterpoint to their actual persona—say, that time Draper wanted to get smacked around a little—but it’s rare that we get deeper than the binary: it’s either perfect analogue or negative image, sexual personality inescapable from actual.

Continue

Realistic Flowers

hazlittmag:

At the dollar store I bought
a bouquet of fake flowers
and what could have been
but somehow (incredibly) wasn’t
It only cost $2 but still
that did not help
                               I planted
the flowers among actual flowers
b/c what else can you do
I was so happy I could have
torn your head apart

-Heather Christle

Toronto is Still Not New York, and Probably Never Will Be

hazlittmag:

image

Did you know that by 2025, Toronto will be more densely populated than New York City? Did you know that it already is? Both are true, if you saw the Bloomberg News chart that made the urbanist rounds on the Internet earlier this week. Residents of the Greater Toronto Area (not to mention Montreal, also allegedly more dense than New York) may have wondered exactly how that happened; you’d think we would have noticed, given our permanent state of anxiety about how we measure up to what is apparently the only other city on the continent that matters. (New York might never have noticed, even if it were true.)

It is, alas, a statistical gimmick.

Continue

Realistic Flowers

At the dollar store I bought
a bouquet of fake flowers
and what could have been
but somehow (incredibly) wasn’t
It only cost $2 but still
that did not help
                               I planted
the flowers among actual flowers
b/c what else can you do
I was so happy I could have
torn your head apart

-Heather Christle

Very glamorous catered lunch here at the Hazlitt Hive Mind.

hazlittmag:

"One thing we’ve all remarked on… is how we look at women differently."

Hazlitt’s Anshuman Iddamsetty speaks with Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits, and Leanne Shapton, about their genre-defying oral history project, Women in Clothes: Why We Wear What We Wear.

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Soundcloud, and via RSS.

"I started to see myself as an object… As a self other people interacted with." – womeninclothes